Virtual Sensor Networks

From The Theme
ADVANCED HUMAN COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES

WHAT IF?
What if we could use sensors to seamlessly exchange information between virtual worlds and the physical world?



WHAT WE SET OUT TO DO
We set out to develop a sensor network for a virtual world, and to develop protocols and tools that combine that sensor network with real-world sensor networks so that they can interoperate.

WHAT WE FOUND
We found that sensors do have the potential to blur the boundaries between virtual and real worlds. Imagine a ring on a cell phone in the real world to alert a virtual shopkeeper that an avatar has entered the store and is seeking assistance. Our findings have prompted us to to re-develop the fundamental architecture of virtual worlds in order to prepare to leverage the potential of virtual sensor networks. This new architecture will guide the subsequent and systematic approach to developing new virtual worlds, including sensors for them.

LEARN MORE
Research aims to make “virtual worlds” as world wide as the Web, 2008

Stanford Information Networks Group (SING), Meru Virtual World Architecture

PEOPLE BEHIND THE PROJECT
Pat Hanrahan is a computer graphics researcher, the Canon USA Professor of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering in the Computer Graphics Laboratory at Stanford University. His research focuses on rendering algorithms, graphics processing units, as well as scientific illustration and visualization.

Philip Levis is Associate Professor in the Computer Science and Electrical Engineering Departments of Stanford University. He heads the Stanford Information Networking Group (SING), co-directs the Secure Internet of Things Project, and holds the Fletcher Jones Faculty Development Chair. Dr. Levis researches operating systems, networks, and software design, especially wireless networks, sensor networks, and embedded systems.

Vladlen Koltun is a Principle Researcher at Intel Labs and directs the Intel Visual Computing Lab, a young and growing lab devoted to basic research. From 2005-2013, Dr. Koltun was an Assistant Professor in Computer Science at Stanford University.


TAGS
HCI, Interaction, Sensors, Virtual Reality