May 31

How Games Move Us: Emotion by Design

May 31, 2016

Event Description:

Interactive media and games increasingly pervade and shape our society. In addition to their dominant roles in entertainment, videogames play growing roles in education, arts, science and health. These talks bring together a diverse set of experts to provide interdisciplinary perspectives on these media regarding their history, technologies, scholarly research, industry, artistic value and potential future. As the speakers and title suggest, the series also provides a topical lens for the diverse aspects of our lives.

Join us every TUESDAY From March 29th until May 31st from 12pm-1pm in the Braun Lecture Hall inside of the Seeley G. Mudd Chemistry Building.

Can't make it to the talk, but have a question for Katherine? Submit your question HERE and it will be asked. By submitting your question, you're allowing mediaX to use and record your submission.

Also listed as one-unit course BIOE196. For more information contact Ingmar@stanford.edu

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Watch Katherine's Presentation

Presenters:

Katherine Isbister, How Games Move Us: Emotion by Design. Designers know games can evoke empathy and intense connection. But everyday non-expert conversations about games still rarely touch on this truth. In this talk, Isbister shares insights from her new book aimed at bridging this gap, toward raising the quality of public conversations about games and their aesthetic power.

Katherine Isbister is a Professor of Computational Media, and core faculty in the Center for Games and Playable Media at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She was the founding research director of the Game Innovation Lab at NYU, and a founding faculty member of the NYU Game Center. Isbister's research focuses on designing games and other interactive experiences that heighten social and emotional connections, toward innovating design theory and technological practice. Isbister has written several books about game design, most recently How Games Move Us from MIT Press.